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Enjoy Music with Roger Kamien Music An Appreciation 7th Brief Edition PDF: A Book Review


Roger Kamien Music An Appreciation 7th Brief Edition PDF Download




Do you love music? Do you want to learn more about the history, theory, and culture of music? If so, then you should download Roger Kamien Music An Appreciation 7th Brief Edition PDF. This book is a comprehensive guide to listening to and understanding music from different styles, periods, genres, forms, instruments, voices, composers, and performers. It is written by Roger Kamien, a renowned musician, teacher, and scholar who has dedicated his life to sharing his passion for music with others. In this article, we will give you an overview of what you can expect from this book and why it is a must-have for any music lover.




roger kamien music an appreciation 7th brief edition pdf download



The Elements of Music




The first part of the book introduces you to the basic elements of music: sound, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, and form. These are the building blocks of music that create its meaning and expression. You will learn how to identify and describe these elements using musical vocabulary and notation. You will also listen to examples from different musical styles and periods that illustrate how these elements are used by composers and performers. Here are some of the topics covered in this part:


  • Sound: How pitch (highness or lowness), dynamics (loudness or softness), and tone color (quality or timbre) affect the sound of music.



  • Rhythm: How duration (long or short), tempo (fast or slow), meter (regular or irregular), accent (emphasis), syncopation (offbeat), and polyrhythm (multiple rhythms) create patterns of movement in music.



  • Melody: How a series of pitches form a tune or theme that can be sung or played by a voice or an instrument.



  • Harmony: How two or more pitches sound together to create chords that support or contrast with the melody.



  • Texture: How many layers of sound are heard at the same time in music. The main types are monophonic (one melody), polyphonic (two or more melodies), homophonic (one melody with chords), and heterophonic (one melody with variations).



  • Form: How music is organized into sections that create contrast, repetition, variation, and unity. The main types are binary (AB), ternary (ABA), rondo (ABACA), theme and variations (A A' A'' A'''), sonata (exposition, development, recapitulation), and fugue (subject, answer, exposition, episode, stretto).



To listen to some of the examples from this part, click on the links below:


  • Sound: Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, first movement



  • Rhythm: Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody



  • Melody: Schubert's Ave Maria



  • Harmony: The Beatles' Let It Be



  • Texture: Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major, first movement



  • Form: Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, first movement



The Musical Styles and Periods




The second part of the book takes you on a journey through the history of Western music from the Middle Ages to the present day. You will learn how music reflects the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of each time period. You will also discover how music evolves and changes over time as composers and performers experiment with new ideas and techniques. Here are some of the topics covered in this part:


  • Music in the Middle Ages (450-1450): How music was influenced by the Christian church, the feudal system, and the Crusades. The main types of music were Gregorian chant (monophonic sacred songs), organum (early polyphony), and secular songs (love songs, dance songs, troubadour songs).



  • Music in the Renaissance (1450-1600): How music was influenced by the humanism, the printing press, and the exploration of new lands. The main types of music were motet (polyphonic sacred songs), mass (polyphonic setting of the Catholic liturgy), madrigal (polyphonic secular songs), and instrumental music (dances, variations, canzonas).



  • Baroque Music (1600-1750): How music was influenced by the absolutism, the scientific revolution, and the colonization of America. The main types of music were concerto grosso (a group of soloists with an orchestra), fugue (a polyphonic composition based on a single theme), opera (a drama sung with orchestra), sonata (a solo or duo with keyboard accompaniment), suite (a set of dances), cantata (a vocal work with orchestra for church or secular occasions), and oratorio (a large-scale vocal work with orchestra based on a biblical story).



  • Classical Music (1750-1820): How music was influenced by the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and the French Revolution. The main types of music were symphony (a large-scale orchestral work in four movements), sonata (a solo or duo with keyboard accompaniment in three or four movements), concerto (a soloist with orchestra in three movements), chamber music (music for a small group of instruments), and classical opera (an opera with a balance between music and drama).



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  • Modern Music (1900-1945): How music was influenced by the World Wars, the technological innovations, and the artistic movements. The main types of music were impressionism (music that creates vague and subtle impressions of mood or atmosphere), expressionism (music that expresses intense and distorted emotions), neoclassicism (music that revives the forms and styles of the classical period), serialism (music that uses a fixed order of pitches to organize all musical elements), nationalism (music that reflects the folk or ethnic identity of a country or region), jazz (music that combines elements of African-American music, such as blues, ragtime, and swing), musical theater (a form of entertainment that combines music, dialogue, acting, and dancing), film music (music that accompanies and enhances the mood and action of a film), and rock (music that combines elements of blues, country, folk, and gospel with electric instruments and amplification).



  • Music Since 1945: How music was influenced by the Cold War, the globalization, and the digital revolution. The main types of music were avant-garde (music that experiments with new and unconventional techniques and sounds), minimalism (music that uses simple and repetitive patterns to create complex effects), electronic music (music that uses electronic devices to produce or manipulate sounds), pop music (music that appeals to a mass audience and reflects the trends and tastes of popular culture), world music (music that incorporates elements from different musical traditions around the world), and postmodernism (music that mixes and matches elements from different styles, periods, genres, and cultures).



To listen to some of the examples from this part, click on the links below:


  • Music in the Middle Ages: Hildegard of Bingen's O Successores



  • Music in the Renaissance: Josquin des Prez's Ave Maria



  • Baroque Music: Vivaldi's The Four Seasons



  • Classical Music: Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik



  • Romantic Music: Chopin's Nocturne in E-flat Major



  • Modern Music: Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring



  • Music Since 1945: John Cage's 4'33"



The Musical Genres and Forms




The third part of the book explores the different musical genres and forms that composers and performers use to express their musical ideas. You will learn how to distinguish between vocal and instrumental music, between sacred and secular music, and between various types of musical structures. You will also listen to examples from different musical styles and periods that demonstrate how these genres and forms are used by composers and performers. Here are some of the topics covered in this part:


  • Vocal Music: Music that uses human voice as the main instrument. The main types are art song (a solo voice with piano accompaniment based on a poem), aria (a solo voice with orchestra accompaniment in an opera or an oratorio), recitative (a solo voice with minimal accompaniment that narrates a story in an opera or an oratorio), chorus (a group of voices with or without accompaniment), lied (a German art song), chanson (a French art song), madrigal (an Italian polyphonic secular song), motet (a polyphonic sacred song), mass (a polyphonic setting of the Catholic liturgy), cantata (a vocal work with orchestra for church or secular occasions), oratorio (a large-scale vocal work with orchestra based on a biblical story), opera (a drama sung with orchestra), operetta (a light opera with spoken dialogue), musical theater (a form of entertainment that combines music, dialogue, acting, and dancing), and rap (a form of spoken word with rhythmic accompaniment).



  • Instrumental Music: Music that uses instruments other than human voice as the main source of sound. The main types are symphony (a large-scale orchestral work in four movements), concerto (a soloist with orchestra in three movements), sonata (a solo or duo with keyboard accompaniment in three or four movements), chamber music (music for a small group of instruments), suite (a set of dances), fugue (a polyphonic composition based on a single theme), program music (instrumental music that tells a story or depicts an image), symphonic poem (a one-movement orchestral work that tells a story or depicts an image), rondo (a musical form that alternates between a main theme and contrasting sections), theme and variations (a musical form that repeats a main theme with different changes each time), and sonata form (a musical form that consists of three sections: exposition, development, and recapitulation).



  • Chamber Music: Music for a small group of instruments, usually one player per part. The main types are string quartet (two violins, one viola, and one cello), piano trio (one violin, one cello, and one piano), woodwind quintet (one flute, one oboe, one clarinet, one bassoon, and one horn), brass quintet (two trumpets, one horn, one trombone, and one tuba), and guitar quartet (four guitars).



  • Symphony: A large-scale orchestral work in four movements, usually with a fast-slow-fast structure. The first movement is often in sonata form, the second movement is often in theme and variations or rondo form, the third movement is often a minuet or a scherzo (a fast and playful dance), and the fourth movement is often in sonata or rondo form.



  • Concerto: A soloist with orchestra in three movements, usually with a fast-slow-fast structure. The first movement is often in sonata form, the second movement is often in theme and variations or rondo form, and the third movement is often in rondo form. The soloist and the orchestra often engage in a dialogue or a competition.



  • Opera: A drama sung with orchestra that combines music, acting, scenery, costumes, and sometimes dance. The main types are opera seria (serious opera based on historical or mythological subjects), opera buffa (comic opera based on everyday life), opera comique (French comic opera with spoken dialogue), singspiel (German comic opera with spoken dialogue), grand opera (French opera with spectacular effects and ballets), verismo opera (Italian opera based on realistic subjects), and musical theater (a form of entertainment that combines music, dialogue, acting, and dancing).



  • Program Music: Instrumental music that tells a story or depicts an image. The main types are program symphony (a symphony with a program), symphonic poem (a one-movement orchestral work with a program), incidental music (music that accompanies a play or a film), tone poem (a short symphonic poem), and ballet (a dance with music that tells a story or depicts an image).



  • Jazz: Music that combines elements of African-American music, such as blues, ragtime, and swing, with elements of European music, such as harmony and form. The main types are New Orleans style (early jazz style that features collective improvisation by a small group of instruments), swing (jazz style that features big bands playing arranged music with solo improvisation), bebop (jazz style that features small groups playing complex and fast music with solo improvisation), cool jazz (jazz style that features relaxed and smooth music with less emphasis on improvisation), hard bop (jazz style that features intense and energetic music with more emphasis on improvisation), modal jazz (jazz style that features music based on modes rather than chords), free jazz (jazz style that features music without fixed harmony, rhythm, or form), fusion (jazz style that combines elements of rock, funk, or other genres), and smooth jazz (jazz style that features easy-listening music with pop influences).



  • Rock: Music that combines elements of blues, country, folk, and gospel with electric instruments and amplification. The main types are rock and roll (early rock style that features simple melodies and rhythms), rockabilly (rock style that combines elements of country and blues), ```html (rock style that features fast and energetic music with guitar effects), folk rock (rock style that combines elements of folk and rock), psychedelic rock (rock style that features experimental and distorted music with drug influences), progressive rock (rock style that features complex and sophisticated music with classical influences), glam rock (rock style that features theatrical and flamboyant music with visual effects), punk rock (rock style that features aggressive and rebellious music with social criticism), heavy metal (rock style that features loud and powerful music with distorted guitars and drums), grunge (rock style that features raw and gritty music with alternative influences), alternative rock (rock style that features diverse and unconventional music with indie influences), and pop rock (rock style that features catchy and accessible music with mainstream influences).



  • World Music: Music that incorporates elements from different musical traditions around the world. The main types are African music (music that features complex rhythms, call-and-response, polyphony, and percussion instruments), Indian music (music that features ragas (melodic modes), talas (rhythmic cycles), improvisation, and sitar (plucked string instrument)), Chinese music (music that features pentatonic scales (five-note scales), heterophony (one melody with variations), and erhu (bowed string instrument)), Japanese music (music that features koto (plucked string instrument), shakuhachi (bamboo flute), shamisen (plucked string instrument), and gagaku (court music)), Indonesian music (music that features gamelan (percussion ensemble), slendro (five-note scale), and pelog (seven-note scale)), Middle Eastern music (music that features maqam (melodic mode), iqa (rhythmic pattern), improvisation, and oud (plucked string instrument)), Latin American music (music that features salsa (dance music with Cuban influences), mariachi (Mexican folk music with brass instruments), bossa nova (Brazilian jazz with samba influences), and tango (Argentinean dance music with accordion instrument)), and Celtic music (music that features reels (fast dance tunes), jigs (triple-time dance tunes), ballads (narrative songs), and fiddle (bowed string instrument)).



To listen to some of the examples from this part, click on the links below:


  • Vocal Music: Puccini's Nessun Dorma from Turandot



  • Instrumental Music: Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata



  • Chamber Music: Mozart's Clarinet Quintet in A Major



  • Symphony: Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik



  • Concerto: Vivaldi's The Four Seasons



  • Opera: Verdi's La Traviata



  • Program Music: Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition



  • Jazz: Louis Armstrong's What a Wonderful World



  • Rock: Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody



  • World Music: Ladysmith Black Mambazo's Homeless



The Musical Instruments and Voices




The fourth part of the book introduces you to the different musical instruments and voices that produce the sounds of music. You will learn how to classify them according to their families, materials, mechanisms, ranges, and timbres. You will also listen to examples from different musical styles and periods that demonstrate how these instruments and voices are used by composers and performers. Here are some of the topics covered in this part:


  • Strings: Instruments that produce sound by vibrating strings that are plucked, bowed, or struck. The main types are violin (the highest-pitched and most versatile string instrument), viola (slightly larger and lower-pitched than the violin), cello (much larger and lower-pitched than the viola), double bass (the largest and lowest-pitched string instrument), harp (an instrument with many strings that are plucked by the fingers), guitar (an instrument with six strings that are plucked or strummed by the fingers or a pick), lute (an ancestor of the guitar with a pear-shaped body and a bent neck), mandolin (a small instrument with eight strings that are plucked by a pick), banjo (an instrument with four or five strings that are plucked by the fingers or a pick and a resonating membrane), and sitar (an Indian instrument with many strings that are plucked by a pick).



Woodwinds: Instruments that produce sound by blowing air into a tube with holes that are covered or uncovered by the fingers or keys. The main types are flute (an instrument with a high-pitched and pure tone that is blown across a hole at one end), piccolo (a smaller and higher-pitched version of the flute), recorder (an instrument with a whistle-like mouthpiece and a soft tone that is blown into a hole at one end), oboe (an instrument with a double reed (two thin pieces of cane that vibrate against each other) and a nasal tone that is blown into a hole at one end), English horn (a larger and lower-pitched version of the oboe), clarinet (an instrument with a single reed (one thin piece of cane that vibrates against a mouthpiece) and a mellow tone that is blown into a hole at one end), bass clarinet (a larger and lower-pitched version


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